Being Here Now

As earth warms
and her ice fields melt
and the skeletal bones of her crust shift
and her hot core cooks up something new,
human structures collapse
along with the Siberian permafrost.

Being here is like being born:
everything is dark and tumultuous
and you don’t know where you’re headed
and you didn’t ask for this
but this, whatever it is, is already happening
and it’s too late to bail out now.

Call the midwife,
Call the female shaman,
Call 911 Multiverse,
We have to learn to let go.

 

‒ Harriet Ann Ellenberger
   3 July 2020

 

Thanks to Jack Dempsey for sending me the photo, which he describes as “a little clay bowl crafted in post-Minoan Crete: likely, a midwife holding and comforting a woman giving water-birth” (from the cave-shrine of Eileithyia, goddess-patron of mothers, at Inatos, near Tsoutsouros, Crete, dated 9th˗6th cent. BCE). His main website on Minoan Crete is Ancientlights.org.

“Being Here Now” was first published in Return to Mago E-zine on 31 August 2020.

Published by

Harriet Ann Ellenberger

writer, editor, translator; co-founded the journal "Sinister Wisdom"

One thought on “Being Here Now”

  1. This poem combines the elegant with the colloquial in a familiar Harriet way that I love and don’t see in other people’s writing. And I love the physicality of understanding of “the skeletal bones of her crust shift.” I like the shift from paragraph to paragraph of where in the poet’s self the words come from. Finally, there’s a flexibility in how the wording happens, a limberness that engages me and takes me along in a personal, friendly way, assuming I will understand and care. And I do.

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