Magic for Big Kids

We were born for this,
to work with the strands
of ancient knowledge
woven into our DNA,
gifts from a long lineage
stored in the 90 percent of our brain
we don’t use.

We are all the descendants of
gathering, fishing, hunting, travelling peoples
who moved through the fullness
of vibrational reality.

Survival depended on being aware.
Willed ignorance was not an option,
nor unbridled greed.

What they found,
they shared.
What they learned,
they passed on.

The nature of reality has not changed.
What they knew remains true.

Everything is alive,
everything is connected,
everything shimmers with significance.

Those who see only in three dimensions
cannot see the spirit world.

That purring under our thoughts is love,
anima mundi,
psyche of the cosmos,
soul of the world.

Listen for the purring,
and many more dimensions unfold.

 

– Harriet Ann Ellenberger, July 2018

 

Note: “Magic for Big Kids” first appeared in Return to Mago E-Magazine on 7 September 2018. The photo is by Simon Matzinger.

 

Another Turn on the Writing Road

It’s been over a year since I published anything on “River Song,” and during those months I’ve been doing a lot of thinking. What do I want to write about now, with fifty-odd years of writing behind me?

For more of those years than I care to remember, my burning question has been the question of human survival. Will human beings learn how to take care of the earth and each other? Or will we refuse to learn, thereby becoming one more memory in the vast memory-stores of the cosmos.

My crystal ball was broken in the last windstorm, so I can’t see what’s coming next. At the moment, however, it looks as if some of us are learning, some of us are adamantly refusing to learn, some of us are immobilized by war and poverty, earth upheavals and political upheavals, and for some of us, the world begins and ends with our own skin.

The future of human children lies in the hands of this motley crew. Am I the only one who thinks we’re in need of an extraterrestrial intervention?

 

note: photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash